Sullivan Free Library's Blog

May 5, 2010

Upcoming Book Discussions

Book Discussion Groups are a great way for avid readers to share their passions with people with similar interests. The Sullivan Free Library has three book discussion groups for adults that meet monthly.  New members are always welcome!  Discussions are friendly and informal; refreshments are served.   To see schedules for each group for the year, visit our web site at: http://www.sullivanfreelibrary.org/Programs.html

The Bridgeport “Attic Salt” Discussion Group will meet on Tuesday, May 25th at 7:00 pm to discuss “The Post-American World” by Fareed Zakaria.  From amazon.com:

“This is not a book about the decline of America, but rather about the rise of everyone else.” So begins Fareed Zakaria’s important new work on the era we are now entering. Following on the success of his best-selling The Future of Freedom, Zakaria describes with equal prescience a world in which the United States will no longer dominate the global economy, orchestrate geopolitics, or overwhelm cultures. He sees the “rise of the rest”—the growth of countries like China, India, Brazil, Russia, and many others—as the great story of our time, and one that will reshape the world. The tallest buildings, biggest dams, largest-selling movies, and most advanced cell phones are all being built outside the United States. This economic growth is producing political confidence, national pride, and potentially international problems. How should the United States understand and thrive in this rapidly changing international climate? What does it mean to live in a truly global era? Zakaria answers these questions with his customary lucidity, insight, and imagination.

The Chittenango Book Discussion Group will meet on Wednesday, May 26th at 7:00 pm to discuss “Stones From the River” by Ursula Hegi.   From Library Journal:

“At the beginning of World War I, Trudi Montag, a dwarf, is born to an unstable mother and a gentle father in a small Rheinish town. Through the Weimar Republic and the Third Reich into the era following World War II she first struggles with–and later draws strength and wisdom from–her inability to fit into a conformist and repressive society. As the town’s librarian and historian, Trudi keeps track of many secrets, revealing the universality of her experience. While Hegi’s ( Floating in My Mother’s Palm , LJ 5/15/90) treatment of history and politics is engaging, her novel’s appeal lies in the humanity of its characters. Particularly strong is her portrayal of, and insight into, the community of women and children as they react to changing conditions in the town. A sensitive and rewarding book.”

On Thursday, May 27th, the Chittenango Classics Book Discussion group will meet at 7:00 pm to discuss “Tess of the D’Ubervilles” by Thomas Hardy.   From the cover of the book:

“Etched against the background of a dying rural society, Tess of the d’Urbervilles was Thomas Hardy’s “bestseller,” and Tess Durbeyfield remains his most striking and tragic heroine. Of all the characters he created, she meant the most to him. Hopelessly torn between two men–Alec d’Urberville, a wealthy, dissolute young man who seduces her in a lonely wood, and Angel Clare, her provincial, moralistic, and unforgiving husband–Tess escapes from her vise of passion through a horrible, desperate act.”

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